Grand Rapids Children’s Museum Adds Vacation Hours

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – Executives at the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum are extending hours for the next vacation after surviving closures during the pandemic and, more recently, a ruptured water line on the second floor.

There are now new exhibits in place for kids to explore, with fewer restrictions on when they can visit.

“I think everyone is going to be very excited if they haven’t seen the brand new Meijer area, and if they haven’t seen the new spin or train table. All of these things that we were able to do while we were closed, ”said Maggie Lancaster, CEO of the museum.

The museum is generally not open on Sundays, but will be during the holidays. Tuesdays are normally reserved for members, but will be open to the public during extended hours.

Although children five and older are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine, the museum still has certain protocols in place.

“We no longer impose tickets in advance. We also no longer require timed entry, we just ask you to wear a mask, ”Lancaster said. “We’re still a place for our zero to five-year-olds, and we just want to be very careful.”

The museum will celebrate its 25th anniversary next year, which will mean more new options for visitors.

“I can’t do it now, but I can’t wait to announce our national show series,” Lancaster said. “It will be after the holidays to celebrate our 25th anniversary. But also in 2022, 2023, 2024, we’ll be announcing who’s coming to town to visit the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum with a traveling exhibit.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit grcm.org.

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